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British wildlife is dying out: Study reveals there are 13 per cent fewer species…

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British wildlife is dying out: Study reveals there are 13 per cent fewer species...

Toxic pollution, climate change and relentless agriculture are pushing many species of wildlife to the brink of extinction in Britain, conservationists warned.

Since the 1970s, when the first serious recording of animal and plant populations began, 13% of organisms have disappeared.

About 133 species have been off the shores of Britain since 1500, including birds such as the wryneck and the serin, which were lost as breeders in the twentieth century.

And now some of the most beloved and wildlife-ravaged countries are disappearing from their UK habitats, according to the State of Nature report.

Butterflies and moths were particularly hard hit – with the number of butterflies decreasing by 17% and moths by 25%.

Mammals like the common mouse (pictured) do poorly with over 26% of species at risk of disappearing completely

Mammals like the common mouse (pictured) do poorly with over 26% of species at risk of disappearing completely

The number of species requiring more specialized habitats – such as High Brown Fritillary and Graylinghave – has decreased by more than three quarters.

Mammals also fare poorly with over 26% of species at risk of disappearing completely.

The wild cat and the big-eared bat are among the species that are on the verge of disappearing.

Common harvest mice and turtle doves have also seen a dramatic drop in population numbers in the UK.

Pollution continues to cause problems for natural areas such as streams, despite legislation to contain harmful pollutants, according to the report, which is a collaboration of more than 70 wildlife organizations with government agencies.

Thousands of hectares of habitats are being lost to development – although forest cover has increased, new wetlands have been created, heaths and heaths restored, and many farmers are farming ecologically.

Turtle doves (pictured in Suffolk) have seen a dramatic drop in species populations since the 1970s.

Turtle doves (pictured in Suffolk) have seen a dramatic drop in species populations since the 1970s.

Data on nearly 700 species of terrestrial, freshwater and marine animals, fish, birds, butterflies and moths show that 41% have seen populations decline since 1970, while 26% have increased and 33% have had little change.

Among thousands of species, from mammals to plants, judged by international criteria, 15% are threatened with getting lost from Britain, including wild cats and larger bats.

About 133 species have been disappearing from Britain's beaches since 1500, says the 2019 State of Nature report, including birds such as wryneck and serine, which were lost as breeders in the twentieth century.

The study, which comes after similar analyzes in 2013 and 2016, also shows that butterfly and moth numbers were particularly affected.

The number of butterflies fell 17% on average and the moths 25%.

Populations of some butterflies, such as brown fritillary and grayish, which require specialized habitats, have fallen by more than three-quarters since 1970.

The number of butterflies that require more specialized habitats - such as the High Brown Fritillary (pictured) and Graylinghave - has decreased by more than three quarters.

The number of butterflies that require more specialized habitats – such as the High Brown Fritillary (pictured) and Graylinghave – has decreased by more than three quarters.

The report also highlights successes, such as the return of red, bitter parrots, large blue butterflies and beavers to Britain, and the establishment of slipper orchids at 11 sites in northern England.

Daniel Hayhow, lead author of the report, said: “We know more about the UK's wildlife than any other country on the planet, and what it is telling us should make us sit and listen.

"We need to respond more urgently if we want to put nature back where it belongs."

Conservation experts called for more ambitious actions, including a strong new set of environmental laws to reverse the decline in nature.

Rosie Hails of the National Trust – the nation's largest private landowner – said: “We are now at a crossroads when we need to join actions rather than words, to stop and reverse the decline of these endangered species as well. how to protect and create new habitats in which they can thrive. & # 39;

Buttercups are among the flowers hardest hit by species decline, according to the State of Nature report.

Buttercups are among the flowers hardest hit by species decline, according to the State of Nature report.

Tony Juniper, president of the Natural England government conservation agency, said there was some reason for optimism as he praised groups and land managers working to help bring species back from the threshold.

But he added: & # 39; This report is an alert. More needs to be done to achieve the ambitions of the government's 25-year environmental plan to reverse nature's decline so that our children can experience and benefit from a richer natural environment. & # 39;

Sophie Pavelle, a young conservationist who helped launch the report, said she felt the loss of nature more acutely this year than any other, with "a less deafening dawn choir, less frantic, bizarre hedges and worrying weather."

Environment Secretary Theresa Villiers said the government has valued the UK ecosystem

Environment Secretary Theresa Villiers said the government has valued the UK ecosystem

“ People protect what they love, and if we can find peculiar and powerful ways to encourage young people to connect emotionally with nature and see it as something they can truly defend, then we can go deeper to find real hope. of a brighter and more sustained life. future for our natural world.

Environment Secretary Theresa Villiers said: “We value our species and ecosystems in their own right, but they also contribute to our well-being and economic prosperity.”

She said the government's 25-year environmental plan marks a radical change in the ambition for nature, and a new environmental bill will contain ambitious measures to address the highest environmental priorities of our era, including restoration and enhancement. from nature to the next generations.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) climate change and global warming

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