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Connect on the links (March 14)

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Connect on the links (March 14)

1) No Vox, Karen Turner reports on people in five countries – China, Iran, Singapore, Italy and South Korea – isolated to avoid catching the coronavirus variant responsible for Covid-19. At the Guardian, Jamie Mackay notes the solidarity between those confined in Florence. In the blog Goats and Soda, Jason Beaubien explains why the Hong Kong and Singapore strategy has worked to contain the disease. At Spectrum, Emily Waltz tells how new digital technologies have helped Taiwan to fight the virus. At the Social Europe, economist Branko Milanovic, an authority on the study of inequality, argues that the new coronavirus works as a social leveler wherever it goes. At the Political European, Bruno Maçães reports his trip through the countries of Asia in the midst of the pandemic. At National Review, Maçãs compares the strategies of China and the United States in the fight against Covid-19.

2) Report on New York Times reconstitutes the series of mistakes made by the government in the early days of the United States outbreak. Failures in the diagnosis of the new virus, the total of which is available in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs), are criticized in the Political and in Vox. Only now, reported the Bloomberg, Americans will have access to faster tests.

U.S. President Donald Trump during a coronavirus ruling on Wednesday (11/3) - Photo: Doug Mills / Pool via Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump during a coronavirus address on Wednesday (11/3) – Photo: Doug Mills / Pool via Reuters

3) No Washington Post, Aaron Blake recalls the Republican deputy who criticized the cuts made by the Donald Trump administration to health organizations like the CDCs. Also in Post, Neil Malhotra regrets that investment in the prevention of epidemics does not yield votes. Not yet Post, Benjamin Haddad criticizes Trump's nativism in the fight against the coronavirus. At Foreign Policy (FP), James Palmer recalls that Trump will not be able to deport him with the restrictions announced this week. Also in FP, Philippe Legrain analyzes the impact of the pandemic on globalization. Also in FP, Suzanne Nossel notes that the truth has become one of Covid-19's biggest victims. On his blog, the former CIA agent Christopher Burgess says that the best sources of information on the extent of the disease are local governments, as in the American state of Washington, one of the hardest hit.

Graph prepared by scientist Drew Harris and adapted by biologist Carl Bergstrom shows how preventive measures can slow the contagion of Covid-19 and prevent the collapse of the health system - Photo: Carl Bergstrom and Esther Kim / CC BY 2.0Graph prepared by scientist Drew Harris and adapted by biologist Carl Bergstrom shows how preventive measures can slow the contagion of Covid-19 and prevent the collapse of the health system - Photo: Carl Bergstrom and Esther Kim / CC BY 2.0

Graph prepared by scientist Drew Harris and adapted by biologist Carl Bergstrom shows how preventive measures can slow the contagion of Covid-19 and prevent the collapse of the health system – Photo: Carl Bergstrom and Esther Kim / CC BY 2.0

4) No Post, David von Drehle makes it clear why the worst news for Trump – the limits of the healthcare system to serve all patients – is yet to come. At the VoxEU, economist Richard Baldwin explains why the contagion curve of the epidemic does not grow exponentially. At the Medium, Thomas Pueyo demonstrates, in a detailed analysis of graphs and numbers, that the sooner the preventive measures are implemented, the less the burden on the health system. At the New York Times, Nicholas Kristof and Stuart Thompson show an interactive graph simulating the different levels of mortality, according to the reaction time of the authorities. At the Vox, Eliza Barclay and Dylan Scott present the flattening graph of the contagion curve, proving the effectiveness of preventive measures.

Red Cross volunteers fighting 1918 Spanish flu - Photo: Getty Images via BBCRed Cross volunteers fighting 1918 Spanish flu - Photo: Getty Images via BBC

Red Cross volunteers fighting 1918 Spanish flu – Photo: Getty Images via BBC

5) Also in Vox, Julia Belluz compares the different estimates for the Covid-19 mortality rate. Not yet Vox, Dylan Matthews criticizes comparisons between the new disease and the devastating 1918 Spanish flu. Guardian, Toby Ord argues that it is always necessary to think of the worst to deal with pandemics.

Valentine couple who decided to stay in Wuhan after the city was quarantined during the Covid-19 epidemic - Photo: CGTN via GloboNewsValentine couple who decided to stay in Wuhan after the city was quarantined during the Covid-19 epidemic - Photo: CGTN via GloboNews

Valentine couple who decided to stay in Wuhan after the city was quarantined during the Covid-19 epidemic – Photo: CGTN via GloboNews

6) Also in Guardian, Jon Henley lists nine reasons to stay calm with Covid-19. Himself Guardian, O Vox it's the New York Post discuss love and sex in times of coronavirus.

Police contain anti-faction protesters in protest in central Athens in 2014 - Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki / AFPPolice contain anti-faction protesters in protest in central Athens in 2014 - Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki / AFP

Police contain anti-faction protesters in protest in central Athens in 2014 – Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki / AFP

7) Not yet Guardian, Daniel Trilling recounts the rise and fall of the Greek neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party over the past decade.

Currency exchange in São Paulo; tourism dollar sold around R $ 4.70 this Friday (3/13) - Photo: Amanda Perobelli / ReutersCurrency exchange in São Paulo; tourism dollar sold around R $ 4.70 this Friday (3/13) - Photo: Amanda Perobelli / Reuters

Currency exchange in São Paulo; tourism dollar sold around R $ 4.70 this Friday (3/13) – Photo: Amanda Perobelli / Reuters

8) No New York Times, Peter Goodman tries to clarify why the dollar continues to be considered a safe store of value worldwide.

9) Also in Times, culinary critic Jay Rayner is amazed at the last meals of those sentenced to death in the United States.

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