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Scientists in the Arctic get high speed internet for the first time via…

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Arctic researchers with MOSAiC expedition (pictured above) will have access to high-speed Internet for the first time thanks to Kepler's new satellite technology

Arctic scientists get high-speed Internet for the first time thanks to new satellite connection one hundred times faster than previously available

  • New Low Orbit Satellites Provide High-Speed ​​Internet to Arctic Researchers
  • Connection was given to scientists on MOSAiC research expedition
  • Internet speeds are 100 times faster than previously available

Researchers' lives in the Arctic have become a little more convenient with the recent arrival of high-speed Internet connections, new to the region.

The connections come from Kepler technology startup, which operates two specially designed satellites in the region, which provide connections 100 times faster than previously available.

Kepler announced that it has delivered verified 120 Mbps uplink and 38 Mbps downlink speeds to the German research vessel Polarstern.

Arctic researchers with MOSAiC expedition (pictured above) will have access to high-speed Internet for the first time thanks to Kepler's new satellite technology

Polarstern is home to the MOSAiC expedition, a one-year project to gather data on the effects of global warming on the Arctic.

The expedition has hundreds of researchers from 19 countries.

Using the high-speed data connection will allow the MOSAiC researcher to transfer data from the ship to shore research stations and, according to a statement by Kepler, improving its ability to share, analyze and disseminate information. 39;

Internet access is provided through two low-orbiting Earth satellites that orbit around the Arctic and provide constant coverage and provide speeds that are one hundred times faster than what would be available.

The year-long MOSAiC expedition is being carried out on the German Polestern (pictured left), which passed a Russian research vessel in October.

The year-long MOSAiC expedition is being carried out on the German Polestern (pictured left), which passed a Russian research vessel in October.

"High polar regions are the last frontiers of the world where high bandwidth data connections could not be established until now," said Markus Rex, a MOSAiC researcher at a statement.

New Kepler's new Global Data Service now allows us to send bulk data, including important data files to monitor instrument status in conjunction with home specialists. This will contribute to the success of MOSAiC. & # 39;

There have been numerous attempts to provide high-speed Internet access to the Arctic, but logistical issues have already proved very expensive.

Businesswoman Elizabeth Pierce raised more than $ 250 million to fund a trans-Arctic cable to provide high-speed internet to the region and other remote locations, including Greenland, Alaska and parts of Japan.

Pierce later admitted one charge of e-fraud and eight charges of aggravated identity theft after it was discovered that she had falsified signatures on many of the contracts used to secure project funding.

HOW DOES THE SATELLITE INTERNET WORK?

An internet service provider converts an internet signal into radio waves.

Radio waves are then sent from a large gateway antenna to a satellite orbiting the earth.

The satellite transmits this radio wave signal to a small satellite dish installed at home or in the workplace.

This small satellite dish converts radio waves into a usable internet signal that is sent to a modem at home or in the office.

The modem distributes this Internet signal to a router, which makes the Internet feed available to various local devices, wirelessly or via Ethernet.

Devices can also be connected directly to the modem.

Satellite Internet access uses radio waves to send data to terrestrial orbiting satellites and then back to customers at remote locations.

Satellite Internet access uses radio waves to send data to terrestrial orbiting satellites and then back to customers at remote locations.

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